Spay Day USA February 26, 2019

Mark your calendar, Low Cost or FREE Spay/Neuter Day for your Pet!

What is Spay day?

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Spay Day USA is a program started by Doris Day and The Doris Day Animal Foundation (DDAF) to focus attention on the pet overpopulation problem and the solution of spaying and neutering your pets and strays. Since 1995, participating veterinary clinics, shelters, and organizations across the country have been offering FREE or low-cost spaying and neutering services on this day. If the cost was holding you back from getting Fido or Fluffy spayed or neutered, now is the time to do your part.

Pet overpopulation is a serious problem…

Pet overpopulation is a serious problem leading to pets that are born only to be euthanized months later. No animal shelter wants to be known as the place where animals come to die or a “kill shelter”, but the truth is there are too many pets surrendered and not enough space, resources and homes to care for them. Think of it, every year around 15 million pets are turned into animal shelters across the country through no fault of their own. Only 25 to 30 percent of these animals are reclaimed by their owners or adopted into new homes. The rest, some 11 million dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens are euthanized as a form of animal control because no one wanted them.

These millions of animals are young, healthy, loving, mixed breeds and purebreds, mostly former house pets that for whatever the reason was given up or abandoned by their owners. Owners who have convinced themselves… ‘he’s a good dog, he’ll get adopted’ or ‘she’s such a cute kitten, she’ll get adopted’, but the cold hard truth is your loving pet may never walk out of that shelter. Fact: Too many pets, too few homes. Overpopulation is real problem.

For every 10,000 humans born per day 70,000 puppies and kittens are born. That represents one human to 15 dogs or 45 cats. As long as these birth rates exist, there will never be enough homes for these animals who are born to be euthanized.

Let’s do the math…

One cat =  2-3 litters per year  +  Each litter = 1-8 kittens = 2.8 surviving kittens per litter
Keep in mind female cats can become pregnant again right after giving birth to her litter and kittens can become pregnant as early as 4 months old.

2 Uncontrolled breeding cats plus all their kittens, if none are spayed add up to:

First year = 12
Second Year = 66
Third Year = 382
Fourth Year = 2,201
Fifth Year = 12,680
Sixth Year = 73,041
Seventh Year = 420,715
Eight Year = 2,423,316

While the overpopulation problem may seem overwhelming, the first step towards prevention and becoming a responsible pet owner is to spay and neuter your pets. This not only prevents unwanted pregnancies and pet overpopulation, but helps decrease behavioral problems (yowling, marking, roaming), reduces the risk of your pet developing certain types of cancer, and overall it helps your pet live a longer, healthier life.

Neutered male dogs live 18% longer than non-neutered, and Spayed female dogs live 23% longer than non-spayed.

Spaying is a simple procedure in which the reproductive organs are removed from female dogs and cats. Neutering is also a simple surgical procedure in which the testicles are removed from male dogs and cats. Most veterinarians will recommend you have your pet spayed or neuter around 8 weeks of age. Your veterinarian will explain the procedure to you and your pet can usually return home the same day.

In Conclusion…

kitten2No one likes to think about healthy, beautiful, affectionate cats, dogs, puppies and kittens losing their lives because no one wants them. Shelters, which offer food, warmth, and medical attention, care very much about these animals, but the volume of pets entering shelters greatly outnumbers the families looking to adopt. Euthanasia protects the unwanted ones from the pain of a life without companionship. A better solution is to limit the number of animals being born until they equal the number of people who want and can care for them.

So please please contact your local veterinarian and get your pet spayed or neutered if you haven’t already done so. If expense is a problem, find a participating Spay Day veterinary clinic, shelter, organization, or ask your local humane society about the low-cost or free spay/neuter clinics in your area that participate in Spay Day USA.

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